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Courtport News is a quarterly newsletter keeping you updated about Courtport developments.  Subscribing to this newsletter is free, and does not require a Courtport account.

Much More Than a Public Record Link Directory

Portal

Our portal enables its subscribers to quickly and affordably conduct critical research tasks utilizing public record information for completing due diligence. We maintain a focused collection of over 10,000 links and continue to regularly add new resources to our nationwide database. Subscribers can easily search or browse our resources, add and store their own resources, and easily share resource links with colleagues.

Use our portal to quickly and inexpensively locate:

  • Court case dockets, filings, rulings, calendars, rules, and forms in all federal and state courts.
  • Business records including UCCs, county recordings, property, and tax records.
  • Criminal records including inmates, arrests, warrants/most wanted, and sex offenders.
  • People records including licensing, disciplinary, and business/social networking profiles.

Blog

Our blog is an effective tool for keeping current with electronic filing and document retrieval news and innovations. Browse by topic or date, full-text search, and post related comments and questions for Courtport and its readers. We offer a variety of RSS feeds for newsreaders, or you can subscribe to receive posts by email. Launched in 2003 on LegalDockets.com, our blog remains highly focused and is most useful to professional researchers in various industries.

Discussion Forums

Our forums facilitate convenient communication between research professionals. Although our discussion forums are geared towards law librarians, they are also utilized by attorneys, commercial vendors, academia, and others. You can participate in discussions on our site and utilize its listserv capabilities. Sometimes when you can’t find an answer you need, your fellow researchers can. When conventional research methods fail, there is strength in numbers, and human knowledge of your peers can produce very effective results.